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Chintz Bars and Flying Geese Quilt
Artist unidentified

Location: United States

Date: 1830–1850

Materials: Cotton

Dimensions: 112 × 101"

Credit: Gift of Dr. Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel

Accession Number: 2012.4.1

Photo credit: Gavin Ashworth

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Description

The chintz quilt tradition includes bedcovers made of cut-out and appliquéd pieces of fabric, quilts composed entirely of pieced scraps, and textiles that combine the two techniques. These styles were popular in America from the late eighteenth to the middle of the nineteenth centuries. The term chintz itself is derived from the Hindu word chitta, meaning “spotted cloth.” The first examples of chintz were brought from India to England by sixteenth-century traders. Over the years, the word has come to refer to a large-scale print, usually finished with a glaze, that is suitable for furnishings such as drapery and upholstery. The border fabric used in this quilt, with a repeated pattern of a leaping stag, is such a fabric. This example is pieced in a Flying Geese variation, a pattern that has been among the most popular American pieced-quilt designs since the eighteenth century.

Stacy C. Hollander, "Chintz Bars and Flying Geese Quilt," exhibition label for alt_quilts: Sabrina Gschwandtner, Luke Haynes, Stephen Sollins. Stacy C. Hollander, curator. New York: American Folk Art Museum, 2013.


Chintz Bars and Flying Geese Quilt
Date: 1830–1850
Artist:
Dimensions: 112 × 101"
Materials: Cotton
Credit Line: Gift of Dr. Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel
Place/Region: United States
Accession Number: 2012.4.1
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